My Intro to Cooke’s ‘Why Did King Charles III Do That?’


John R. Houk, Blog Editor

© September 21, 2022

Tony Cooke was one of Instructors in the days I attended what was then RHEMA Bible Training Center (Now RHEMA Bible Training College) in the two-year program 1982-84. And so yup, I signed up to be on his email list from the Tony Cooke Ministries website.

On September 16 I received an email that caught my attention under the subject, “Why Did King Charles III Do That?

The UK lost their longest reigning monarch Queen Elizabeth II and her oldest son Charles assumed the throne as King Charles III. The reason the subject title caught my attention is I am fully aware King Chuck is fully behind the elitist agenda of the Globalist World Economic Forum (WEF) which offers ZERO that is pleasant toward American Liberty (I hope Americans see the Declaration of Independence irony here) and Individual Freedom.

Alas … Brother Cooke addressed none of my Prince Chuck concerns. BUT pieced together an interesting piece of Church history that addresses Religious Liberty using the newly minted King Charles III signing an oath “to uphold the security of the Church in Scotland.” I have to wonder how much King Chuck will honor that oath considering his WEF Globalist pedigree.

So, let’s join Tony Cooke on this historical snapshot of Church history in regard to UK history from the email.

JRH 9/21/22

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Why Did King Charles III Do That?

King of Hearts (Suicide King – another irony?) & Title

By Tony Cooke

Sent via TCM

Sent 9/16/22 7:59 AM

Shortly after the death of Queen Elizabeth II, the announcement was made that her son, Prince Charles, would succeed her and would be known as King Charles III. Two days after her passing, at the ceremony where Charles III was formally proclaimed the new King of England, he signed an oath to uphold the security of the Church in Scotland. This was all part of the established protocol for an incoming monarch.
 
The history of Christianity in England is loaded with intricacies and complexities, and much of it doesn’t seem to have anything to do with what Jesus taught and promoted. In certain eras, political maneuvering abounded and the ruling party in religious conflicts would sometimes banish, behead, or burn opponents at the stake. Threats and intimidation were commonplace. “Live and let live” was certainly not the prevailing attitude of those who held religious and political power.
 
Before we examine why King Charles III signed a document respecting the sovereignty of the Church of Scotland, let’s look at Charles I (1600-1649) and Charles II (1630-1685). King Charles I followed the reign of King James I (who authorized the production of the Authorized Version of the Bible, also known as the King James Bible). King Charles I opposed and took action against any group that resisted the State Church, especially the Scots. While there were many factors involved in his political demise, he was eventually tried for treason and executed.
 
Later, Charles II ascended to the throne of England. As a playboy, he would be known and remembered as the “Merry Monarch.” Believers, including those in Scotland and Ireland, who did not want their churches under government control were targeted by the King and by Parliament. Puritans (those who wanted to “purify” the church of England) suffered during this time as the Church of Scotland, which wanted to operate independently based on a Presbyterian form of church government.
 
Britannica states that “The Conventicle Act of 1664 punished any person over 16 years of age for attending a religious meeting not conducted according to The Book of Common Prayer. The Five Mile Act of 1665 prohibited any ejected minister from living within five miles of a corporate town or any place where he had formerly served.”[1] In other words, if you don’t operate your church under the State Church and its directives, you were going to suffer.
 
We want to take a quick look at two Scottish ministers who stood up against governmental and ecclesiastical tyranny, John Knox (1514-1572) and Samuel Rutherford (1600-1661).
 
In 1547, John Knox and other Protestants were taken prisoner and he served as a galley slave (chained and rowing) for nineteen months. Later he spent time exiled in Geneva, but he eventually returned to Scotland to work toward a church free from government control. It is said that Mary Queen of Scots remarked, “I fear the prayers of John Knox more than all the assembled armies of Europe.”
 
As he approached death, Knox prayed, “Come, Lord Jesus. Sweet Jesus into Thy hand I commend my spirit. Be merciful, Lord, to Thy Church, which Thou hast redeemed. Give peace to this afflicted commonwealth. Raise up faithful pastors who will take charge of Thy Church.” The epitaph on his grave read, “Here lies a man who in his life never feared the face of man.”
 
Samuel Rutherford, a Scottish Presbyterian pastor, lived in a century that saw many suffer martyrdom for their faith. At one point, Rutherford himself was banished from the city where he pastored and was forbidden to preach. Through the influence of Rutherford and others, a National Covenant was signed in 1638 (during the time of Charles I’s reign). This document expressed their resistance to the imposition of State Church regulations on their worship based on the fact that Jesus Christ is the true head of the Church. It is said that some Scots signed this covenant in their own blood.
 
Later, Rutherford authored a book entitled Lex Rex (The Law of the King). In this work, he stressed God’s absolute authority and argued for limited governmental authority. Under the reign of King Charles II, this book was banned and burned. When Rutherford was charged with treason and demanded to appear before the authorities, he was already on his deathbed and responded with this statement: “I have a summons already from a superior judge, and it is better that I answer my first summons. I now go to be where few kings and great people come.”
 
Summary
Today in America, we think nothing of different denominational and independent churches existing and working peacefully side by side. This has not been the case through much of western history. Our freedoms are due in large part to the battles for religious freedom in Europe, even to the point that the initial statement in our Constitution’s First Amendment is: “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof…”
 
Also, we can better understand why one of the first actions taken by the new King of England, Charles III, was to sign a document guaranteeing respect for the independence of the Church of Scotland. It is all rooted in history.
 
Great Statements by John Knox (1514 – 1572)

John Knox (1514 – 1572)

The Scriptures of God are my only foundation and substance in all matters of weight and importance.”

“Live in Christ, die in Christ, and the flesh need not fear death.”
 
“A man with God is always in the majority.”
 
“Lord, give me Scotland or I die!”
 
“When I think of those who have influenced my life the most, I think not of the great but of the good.”
 
“O Lord Eternal, move and govern my tongue to speak the truth.”
 
“None have I corrupted, none have I defrauded; merchandise have I not made.”

Great Statements by Samuel Rutherford (1600 – 1661)

Samuel Rutherford (1600 – 1661)

“Believe God’s love and power more than you believe your own feelings and experiences. Your rock is Christ, and it is not the rock that ebbs and flows but the sea.”
 
“They lose nothing who gain Christ.”

“My faith has no bed to sleep upon but omnipotence.”

“Jesus Christ came into my prison cell last night, and every stone flashed like a ruby.”

“Make not Christ a liar in distrusting His promise.”

“Grace tried is better than grace, and more than grace; it is glory in its infancy.”

“I seldom made an errand to God for another, but I got something for myself.”

Footnote

[1] https://www.britannica.com/topic/Protestantism/The-Restoration-1660-85

Bible teacher and author Tony Cooke graduated from RHEMA Bible Training Center in 1980 and received degrees from North Central University (Bachelor’s in Church Ministries) and Liberty University (Master’s in Theological Studies/Church History). His ministerial background includes pastoral ministry, teaching in Bible schools, and directing a ministerial association. Tony’s passion for teaching the Bible has taken him to more than thirty nations and nearly all fifty states. He is the author of a dozen books, of which, various titles have been translated and published in eight other languages. Tony and his wife, Lisa, reside in Broken Arrow, Oklahoma, and are the parents of two adult children

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Medical Description of the Flogging and Crucifixion of Jesus


My lovely wife sent this Easter message to from Rev. Tony Cooke. Rev. Cooke was one of my instructors when I attended RHEMA Bible Training Center (now RHEMA Bible Training College) between 1982 – 84.

 

 Rev. Tony Cooke

 

JRH 4/16/17

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Medical Description of the Flogging and Crucifixion of Jesus

 

Origin Tony Cooke

Email Sent 4/15/2017 10:03 AM

Excerpted From: The Expositors Bible Commentary

 

(Commenting on Mark 15:15) The Romans first stripped the victim and tied his hands to a post above his head. The whip (flagellum) was made of several pieces of leather with pieces of bone and lead embedded near the ends. Two men, one on each side of the victim, usually did the flogging. The Jews mercifully limited flogging to a maximum of forty stripes; the Romans had no such limitation. The following is a medical doctor’s description of the physical effects of flogging.

 

The heavy whip is brought down with full force again and again across Jesus’ shoulders, back, and legs. At first the heavy thongs cut through the skin only. Then, as the blows continue, they cut deeper in the subcutaneous tissues, producing first and oozing of blood from the capillaries and veins of the skin, and finally spurting arterial bleeding from vessels in the underlying muscles… Finally the skin of the back is hanging in long ribbons and the entire area is an unrecognizable mass of torn, bleeding tissue. (C. Truman Davis, “The Crucifixion of Jesus.  The Passion of Christ from a Medical Point of View,” Arizona Medicine 22, no. 3 [March 1965]: 185)

 

It is not surprising that victims of Roman floggings seldom survived.

 

(Commenting on Mark 15:17-18) The crown was made of some kind of prickly plant such as abounds in Palestine. This they pressed into his scalp. Again there must have been copious bleeding because the scalp is one of the most vascular areas of the body.

 

(Commenting on Mark 15:19) The mocking was followed by further physical violence. The blows hitting his head from the staff drove the thorns more deeply into Jesus’ scalp and caused even more profuse bleeding. They also kept spitting on him…

 

(Commenting on Mark 15:20) At last tiring of their sadism, the soldiers tore the robe from Jesus’ back. The fabric had probably stuck to the clots of blood and serum in the wounds.  Thus when it was callously ripped off him, it caused excruciating pain, just as when a bandage is carelessly removed. Jesus’ own clothes were now put back on him.

 

(Commenting on Mark 15:21) Men condemned to die by crucifixion were customarily required to carry the heavy wooden crosspiece (patibulum) on which they were to be nailed, to the place of execution. Jesus started out carrying his cross (John 19:17), but it proved to be too much for him.  The patibulum usually weighed thirty or forty pounds and was usually strapped across the shoulders. One can hardly imagine the pain caused by the rough heavy beam pressing into the lacerated skin and muscles of Jesus’ shoulders. The scourging of blood so weakened him that he could not go on carrying the heavy crossbeam.

 

(Commenting on Mark 15:24) Mark simply says, “And they crucified him.” What incredible restraint! Especially when one considers that crucifixion was, as Cicero said, “the cruelest and most hideous punishment possible” (In Verrem 5.54.165).  What took place physically is described by Davis (“Crucifixion of Jesus,” pp. 186-187).

 

Simon is ordered to place the patibulum on the ground and Jesus is quickly thrown backwards with his shoulders against the wood. The legionnaire feels for the depression at the front of the wrist. He drives a heavy, square, wrought-iron nail through the wrist and deep into the wood. Quickly he moves to the other side and repeats the action, being careful not to pull the arms too tightly, but to allow some flexion and movement. The cross is then lifted into place.

 

The left foot is pressed backward against the right foot, and with both feet extended, toes down, a nail is driven through the arch of each, leaving the knees moderately flexed. The victim is now crucified. As he slowly sags down with more weight on the nails in the wrists, excruciating, fiery pain shoots along the fingers and up the arms to explode in the brain—the nails in the wrists are putting pressure on the median nerves. As he pushes himself upward to avoid this stretching torment, he places the full weight on the nail through his feet. Again he feels the searing agony of the nail tearing through the nerves between the metatarsal bones of the feet.

 

At this point, another phenomenon occurs. As the arms fatigue, cramps sweep through the muscles, knotting them in deep, relentless, throbbing pain. With these cramps comes the inability to push himself upward to breathe. . . . Air can be drawn into the lungs but not exhaled. Jesus fights to raise himself in order to get even one small breath. Finally carbon dioxide builds up in the lungs and in the blood stream, and the cramps partially subside. Spasmodically he is able to push himself upward to exhale and bring in life-giving oxygen.

 

Hours of this limitless pain, cycles of twisting, joint-rending cramps, intermittent partial asphyxiation, searing pain as tissue is torn from his lacerated back as he moves up and down against the rough timber. Then another agony begins a deep, crushing pain deep in the chest as the pericardium slowly fills with serum and begins to compress the heart.

 

It is now almost over—the loss of tissue fluids reached a critical level—the compressed heart is struggling to pump heavy, thick, sluggish blood into the tissues—the tortured lungs are making a frantic effort to gasp in small gulps of air. . . . The body of Jesus is now in extremis, and He can feel the chill of death creeping through his tissues . . . . His mission of atonement has been completed.  Finally he can allow His body to die.
All this, the Bible records with the simple words, “And they crucified him” (Mark 15:24).

 

The article is excerpted from The Expositors Bible Commentary (Volume 8, pages 775-780, Zondervan Publishing House, Grand Rapids, Michigan, 1984.)

 

+++

Blog Editor: Visualize the blood, pain and suffering must have felt by volunteering to freely give up his life that all who believe might have life. What it we believe?

 

Christ was Crucified and died the same day. Counting Crucifixion day, the third day arose bodily from the tomb after defeating Satan and taking hold of the keys of death and life. Christ’s new life is our life if only we believe:

 

But to each one of us grace was given according to the measure of Christ’s gift. Therefore He says:

 

“When He ascended on high,
He led captivity captive,
And gave gifts to men.”[a]

 

(Now this, “He ascended”—what does it mean but that He also first[b] descended into the lower parts of the earth? (Ephesians 4: 7-9 NKJV)

 

==

 

19 For I through the law died to the law that I might live to God. 20 I have been crucified with Christ; it is no longer I who live, but Christ lives in me; and the life which I now live in the flesh I live by faith in the Son of God, who loved me and gave Himself for me. (Galatians 2: 19-20 NKJV)

 

Jesus is Risen indeed!

______________

Bio for Tony Cooke

 

Bible Teacher and Author, Tony Cooke has been married to his wife, Lisa, since 1979. Together, they have been serving the Body of Christ since 1980.

 

Since 2002, Tony and Lisa have traveled full-time with an assignment of “Strengthening Churches and Leaders.” Tony’s passion for teaching the Bible has taken him to forty-six states and twenty-six nations.

 

In 2014, the website of Tony Cooke Ministries reached 230,967 unique individuals, many of them pastors, missionaries, and other church leaders in 219 nations and territories with encouraging and helpful ministerial resources.

 

Books authored by Tony include: Life After DeathIn Search of TimothyGrace: the DNA of GodQualifiedThrough the Storms, Your Place on God’s Dream Team, and The Work Book: What We Do Matters to God.

 

Prior to traveling, Tony was involved in pastoral ministry for more than twenty years, and served as an Instructor and the Dean of Rhema Bible Training Center. He also served for thirteen years as the Director of an International Ministerial Association.

 

In addition to being a 1981 graduate of RHEMA Bible Training Center, Tony studied Religion at Butler University and received a degree in Church Ministries from North Central University.

 

Tony, and Lisa reside in Broken Arrow, Oklahoma and are the parents of two adult children, Laura and Andrew.

 

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