Learn the Islam that Apologists will not Tell YOU About


Shariah Compliant Public Schools

 

John R. Houk

© March 20, 2012

 

You do realize it is important to teach religion as history in public schools. It is important because the culture we live in today is largely the result of Greek, Roman and Judeo-Christian culture. People should know the roots of their culture to understand the present.

 

Since 9/11 the American education system has been drawn to add more information in text books for grade levels six through twelve. That is understandable because prior to 9/11 Americans thought of Muslims more as Arabs. And Arabs were thought of as camel jockeys stuck in medieval mode in a modern age.

 

The image is not exactly a complimentary one in the description of Muslims. The 9/11 attack perpetrated on American soil did little to brush up that image with the American mind. The majority of the Muslim terrorists that hijacked jets were of Saudi Arabian origin and all were at least Middle Eastern.

 

The fact that the terrorists were from a nation in which Radical Islam is the State Religion of the land is important to know. The Saudi kingdom is dominated by Wahhabism. The purist Islam of the Wahhabis is derived from a Sunni Muslim Cleric that lived in the 18th century. The founder of Wahhabism is Muhammad ibn Abd al-Wahhab (c. 1702–c. 1791).

 

The 9/11 terrorists were influenced by the Wahhabism of Saudi Arabia (the bin Laden al Qaeda origin); the Wahhabis are not the only Caliphate minded Radical Islamic (i.e. purist Islam) groups around. There are others. I will not pretend to make an exhaustive list here but here are a few other Radical Muslim groups:

 

Salafists:

 

Jihadi ideology is based today on what is commonly known as Salafism, an ambiguous concept that has served to designate various and very different movements throughout the years. The term is derived from the word Salaf, which means to precede. In Islamic vocabulary, it is used to describe the followers of al Salaf al salih, the virtuous fathers of the faith who were the companions of the Prophet. The group includes the first three generations of Muslims.[1] Since they learned Islam directly from the Prophet, they understood the true meaning of the religion. Salafis aim to eradicate the impurities introduced during centuries of religious practice. Interpretations not based on the original sources of the religion are viewed as distortions that lead Muslims to stray from the path of God. Salafis have constructed a method (manhaj) to help the search for religious truth. It is a methodology for determining the correct interpretation of the religion, based on the Koran, the Sunna, and the example of the first Muslims.

 

The method is based on a series of core concepts, foremost among them the tawhid or belief in the uniqueness of God.[2] Another essential concept in Salafi ideology is bid’a or any innovation in the faith. Salafis argue that since the Koran and Sunna reveal the true nature of Islam, any innovation is a distortion of the path to God and is therefore to be rejected.[3] Salafis also devote considerable attention to the science of the hadiths, and call themselves the People of the Hadith (Ahl al-Hadith).In their opinion, the hadiths are, according to the Koran, the most important source of religious knowledge and guidance, providing the best example of how Islam was practiced when it was first introduced. Hence, many Salafi scholars devote themselves to the science of the hadiths in order to eliminate those that are false and thus be able to propose an exact version of the tradition of the Prophet. Lastly, Salafis consider the division of Muslims into separate schools to be unacceptable, because there can only be one correct interpretation or opinion. One of the main problems the Muslim community is experiencing is precisely this blind adherence or imitation (taqlid) of a particular school. Salafis insist, therefore, that the truth is to be found in the sources, not in the texts written by jurists.

 

Salafism is thus a path and a method to search for religious truth, a desire to practice Islam exactly as it was revealed by the Prophet. The Salafi mission is grounded on avoidance of bid’a and shirk, strict adherence to the principle of tawhid and a desire to transcend the differences between the various schools, as well as the quest for religious truth in the original sources of Islam.[4]

 

 

… The most radical Salafis base their interpretation of jihad on the writings of Ibn Taymiyya [10] and, like him, they consider that actions by governments that are contrary to Islamic law can be considered proof in order to declare them non-believers. The takfir thus became an instrument that could be used to oppose any regime whatsoever through armed struggle.

 

 

In tandem with the evolution of Salafism, jihadi ideology gradually gained ground in Afghanistan and eventually merged with Salafism. Its chief proponent was Abdallah Azzam, who in 1984, founded the Maktab al-Khidamat (MAK), an office for recruiting Arabs to fight against the Soviets in Afghanistan. Azzam was to have a decisive influence on Usama bin Ladin. In his work, The Main Obligation of Muslims is to Defend the Land of Islam, Azzam writes that jihad is a moral obligation for all Muslims, the sixth pillar of the faith. Using an epic and mystic language, he sets out a vision of the world based on strict Salafism and on calls to martyrdom, stressing the permanent state of humiliation suffered by the umma, as a result of the actions of crusaders and Zionists. His work was to have a decisive influence on the jihadi radicalism of the 1990s.[12]

 

 

The global proliferation of fighting Salafism and its fusion with jihadi ideology were further consolidated under bin Ladin. His declaration of war on the West-backed by the creation in 1998 of the World Islamic Front for Jihad against Jews and Crusaders caused groups that had originally been set up to provide logistical support to al-Qa’ida (e.g. the Islamic Group of Moroccan Combatants) and had originally sought to purify and punish society, to now set their sights on the West. The struggle was no longer confined to the nearest enemy but also to those further away. Fighting Salafism assumed the role of globalizing the jihad born out of the Afghan experience and became the core ideology of the new radical Islamism.  

 

 

Salafism is first and foremost a method for the search of the religious truth; a desire to practice Islam exactly as it was revealed by the Prophet. It is a religious method whose influence has spread throughout the Arab world and also in Europe, thanks to the support received from Saudi Arabia and the Gulf States, which have helped expand this peculiar vision of Islam that is very close to Wahhabism. Its influence is on the rise and it has successfully impregnated several Islamist movements, including some sectors of the Muslim Brotherhoods. …

 

The fighting version of Salafism has also become the core ideology of the global jihadism sponsored by al-Qaida and the radical utopia of Abdallah Azzam. This ideology, aided by the proselytizing work of radical clerics, has led to the emergence in Europe of small groups with the capability to carry out independent terrorist strikes. … [Excerpted from a very long essay – Read Details in Entirety. I am guessing the question marks is grammar my browser did not pick-up correctly]

 

Barelvi Islam:

 

The Legacy Of Syed Ahmad Barelvi In India

 

By R. Upadhyay

October 30, 2010

Eurasia Review

[Excerpts]

 

 

Despite the continuity of Islamic rule for centuries in larger parts of the sub-continent, the Muslim community in India was sharply divided into two exclusive segments namely those who were the descendents of Arab, Turk, Iranian and Afghan conquerors known as Ashraf (Noble Muslims) and those neo-convert Indians who were known as Ajlafs (Low category Muslims). Since the priestly class of this society mostly remained aligned with Ashrafs, orthodox Islam did not penetrate deep into the daily lives of the Muslim proletariat (Ajlafs) who maintained continuous emotional link with their Hindu past and were even practicing their pre-Islamic customs and celebrations. Therefore, Waliullah’s movement was meant for purifying the Ajlafs. It is said that Waliullah era was the beginning of Muslim renaissance following the decline of Islamic rule.

 

After the death of Waliullah in 1762 , his son Abdul Aziz (1746-1822) succeeded him in the theological saddle of Delhi and carried forward the ideological heritage of his father’s movement. Since the Marathas were already on retreat after their defeat by Abdali in the third battle of Panipat in 1761 and the British were marching towards Delhi, he converted the movement launched by his father into Jihad against the British after declaring India as Darul Harb (House of war). When the British army marched to Delhi in 1803 and Mogul emperor became a British vassal, he also issued a fatwa appealing to the Muslims for launching Jihad against the British and for restoring the rule of Islamic glory. Finding his disciple one Syed Ahmad Barelvi who was born in November 1786 in Rai Bareilley in the present Uttar Pradesh and belonged to the family distantly related to his family suitable for leading the Jihad, … Later he sent Ahmad Barelvi to Mecca in order to acquire the ideological knowledge of Islam from the Wahhabi clerics of Arabia. During course of his stay in Arabia he was greatly influenced with the spirit of Wahhabism and returned to India sometime in the early years of 1820s.

 

On his return from Mecca, Ahmad Barelvi also known as founder of Wahhabi movement in India, founded an organization namely Tariqah-i Muhhamdiyah (The Way of the Prophet Muhammad) and designated himself as Amir al Mumin (Commander of the Believers). Fully inspired with Waliullah’s political thought for converting the Ajlafs into true Islamists, he toured the length and breadh (sic) of the country particularly Bihar, Bengal, Punjab and Kashmir and found that the Ajlafs were still following Islam within their pre-Islamic cultural mindset like visiting even the Hindu mystics, also following their recommendations for overcoming their worldly problems, having no inhibition in wearing their pre-Islamic dresses. They constituted the larger majority of Muslim society and were therefore the main target area of Barelvi for their brainwashing and turning them into full-fledged Muslims.

 

[The above excerpts are written by a person notably that is an aficionado of Marxism. Read the essay in Entirety]

____________

 

 

Syed Ahmed Shaheed Barelvi

 

June 11, 2010

Guess Papers

[Excerpts]

 

 

The Mujahideen Movement

 

Syed Ahmed Shaheed Brelvi started a great movement in the North of India; this movement is known as “The Mujahideen Movement” or “The Movement o Jihad”. This movement arranged a power for the struggle of freedom in Muslims which produced a spirit of survival and they started freedom struggle.

Background of the Mujahideen Movement

Syed Ahmed Shaheed Brelvi selected a particular way on the command of his spiritual guide Shah Abdul Aziz and devoted himself in the preparation of the holy war. He started a national movement for this purpose in 1818 and organized this movement after [h]is arrival from Hajj as the Mujahideen Movement in 1831.

 

Objectives of Mujahideen Movement

 

He wanted to make the Muslims as the true lover of Islam, for this purpose he started the Mujahideen Movement.

The main objectives of the Mujahideen Movement were following;

 

·         To preach unicity of Almighty Allah.

 

·         To revive the teachings of Islam and prepare the Muslims to pass their lives simply according to the teachings of Islam.

 

·         To protect the Muslims against such acts and ideas which are contrary to Islamic values.

 

·         To protect the Muslims from the worship of other things except Allah.

 

·         To preach Jihad because it was not possible to get freedom from evil force without armed struggle.

 

Syed Ahmed Shaheed Brelvi wanted to eliminate the domination of Sikhs in Punjab and N.W.F.P to revive Islamic values and traditions.

 

[Read essay in Entirety]

 

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Barelvi Islam

 

GlobalSecurity.org

[Excerpts]

 

Deobandis and Barelvis are the two major groups of Muslims in the Subcontinent apart from the Shia. Barelvi Hanafis deem Deobandis to be kaafir. Those hostile to the Barelvis deprecated them as the shrine-worshipping, the grave-worshiping, ignorant Barelvis. …

 

 

The differences between these sects can be difficult to understand. For the Barelvis, (who are mostly from the Pakistan province of Punjab) the holy Prophet is a superhuman figure whose presence is all around us at all times; he is hazir, present; he is not bashar, material or flesh, but nur, light. The Deobandis, who also revere the Prophet, argue he was the insan-i-kamil, the perfect person, but still only a man, a mortal. Barelvis emphasise a love of Muhammad, a semi-divine figure with unique foreknowledge. The Deobandis reject this idea of Muhammad, emphasising Islam as a personal rather than a social religion.

 

 

… The Wahhabi (Arabia), Deobandi (Pakistan and India) and Jamaat-I-Islami all are anti-sufi, and against the over devotion to Muhammad, whereas the Barelvis emphasize Muhammad’s uniqueness. Indeed, nearly 85% of South Asia’s Sunni Muslims are said to follow the Barelvi school, closer to Sufism. The remaining 15% of Sunnis follow the Deobandi school, more closely related to the conservative practice of Islam. Most Shiites in the subcontinent also tend to be influenced by the Sufis. Pakistan’s Muslims, like other Muslims in the region, tend to follow a school of Islam which is less conservative, and hence the support for strongly and overtly religious parties has been minimal.

 

[Read in Entirety]

______________________________

 

Sufi Militants Struggle with Deobandi Jihadists in Pakistan

 

Article from Jamestown Foundation (JF Homepage)

Pub. Date: 24 February 2011

Refworld (affiliated with UNHRC)

 

As Punjab governor Salman Taseer came out of a restaurant in an upscale area of Islamabad, one of his bodyguards uttered the slogan “Allahu Akbar” and fired on the man he was supposed to guard, killing him on the spot. The assassin in the January 4 killing, Malik Mumtaz Qadri, belonged to the Elite Punjab Police, a force specially trained in counterterrorism work and the protection of important individuals (Dawn [Karachi], January 5). Qadri was also believed to be associated with the South Asian Barelvi Sufi movement. The other bodyguards from the elite force did not try to stop him and the smiling Qadri surrendered to his fellow officers after he made sure the governor was dead. He later told the police that he had killed the governor because Taseer had insulted the Prophet of Islam by describing Pakistan’s controversial blasphemy laws as “black laws.” …

 

 

… the killer belonged to the Dawat-e-Islami, a Barelvi Sufi group which normally shuns violence and has been in the forefront of the struggle against Deobandism (a conservative Sunni religious movement that has become associated with militancy) and the Ahle Hadith jihadi groups. Founded in 1984 as a small group around Pir (spiritual leader) Mohammad Ilyas Attar Qadri, Dawat-e-Islami grew into a formidable organization by the mid-1990s when more than 100,000 persons gathered at its periodic ijtimahs (conventions). [1] Pir Ilyas Attar Qadri had sensed Deobandi extremism would grow as a result of the Afghan jihad and wanted to organize the Ahle Sunnat to face that challenge. However, Pir Ilyas believed in peaceful resistance. [2] Surprisingly, the Dawat-e-Islami is loosely structured on the model of the Deobandi Tablighi Jamaat (an international Islamic reform movement). …

 

 

Formation of the Sunni Tehrik

Pir Ilyas Qadri’s reluctance to adopt violence against Deobandi jihadi groups led to a mini-rebellion among his followers, particularly those who had studied at Barelvi madrassahs. Consequently, a small group led by Saleem Qadri founded the Sunni Tehrik in 1990. Saleem Qadri wanted to meet Deobandi violence with more violence, as Pir Ilyas Qadri’s “non-violence was not taking the Barelvis anywhere.” [4] However, Saleem Qadri did not break his religious allegiance to Pir Ilyas Qadri even after leaving his group, nor did he ask his followers to break links with the Dawat-e-Islami. This approach worked and soon the ranks of the Sunni Tehrik swelled. The membership of the Dawat-e-Islami and the Sunni Tehrik also overlaps at the lower levels with several other Barelvi groups.

The Sunni Tehrik was the first Barelvi group to articulate the demands of the majority Barelvi sect and to use violence to achieve them. Their four basic demands were:

• The protection of Ahle Sunnat beliefs.

• The protection of the rights of the Ahle Sunnat.

• The protection of Ahle Sunnat mosques.

• The protection of the Ahle Sunnat awqaf (religious endowments), such as shrines. [5]

The Sunni Tehrik was ready to use violence to achieve the last two demands in response to Deobandi groups’ use of violence to take over Barelvi mosques and awqaf property.  

 

 

… the most important thing was that the Jamaat Ahle Sunnat had adopted the Sunni Tehrik narrative of a forceful defense of Barelvi interests as its own. The Jamaat Ahle Sunnat emerged much stronger after the convention and began to play a major part in the country’s Islamist politics.

 

 

The assassination of Governor Salman Taseer shows that Sufi Islamism can be a bulwark against or an alternative to Deobandi and Ahle Hadith jihadism but it is in its own way as great a threat to international security as the militancy of the Deobandi and Ahle Hadith movements. [Read in Entirety]

 

Deobandi

 

Deobandi Islam: The Religion of the Taliban

Information provided and used with permission from the Defense Language Institute at: wrc.lingnet.org (Google goes HERE for the link)

 

Posted by GlobalSecurity.org

PDF dated: 2001

 

 

From its inception the school at Deoband made a sharp distinction between ‘revealed’ or sacred knowledge, and ‘human’ or secular knowledge. The school excluded all learning that was not obviously Islamic by firmly rejecting other religious traditions (the Hinduism of India and the Christianity of the British missionaries) and forbidding Western-style education and the study of any subjects not directly related to the study of the Quran.

 

The school was also highly critical of Islam as it was practiced in the modern world, especially India. They felt the established religious order had made too many compromises with its foreign environment and therefore Islam needed to be purified of these foreign elements. To live out the pure Islamic tradition they embraced Taqlid (acceptance of the old interpretations) and rejected ijitehad or reinterpretation of Islamic precepts to accommodate the changing times. It should also be noted that they are strict adherents to the Hanafi school of thought.xii

 

 

… In the late 19th and early 20th century the Deobandi school was embroiled, and to a great extent preoccupied, in a verbal “fatwa war” with the Bid’ati school. With more than a quarter of a million fatwas (legal opinions) being issued on some of the most ordinary issues of daily life, the fatwa war helped the Deobandi scholars clarify their thinking. It also served to harden their deeply conservative theological and ethical positions. As a result of the fatwa war the Dar-ul-Uloom madressa became much more traditional than it was when first established in 1866. That is, it moved much further to the right than the founding fathers would have ever imagined.

 

As the school grew in years it also grew in size and prestige. xiii Dar-ul-Uloon became ‘the’ place to prepare young men to become educated in the Islamic tradition. …

 

 

Indian independence from British rule in 1947 was met with a bloody partitioning of the subcontinent into two independent nations…India and Pakistan. …

 

Dar-ul-Uloon however, had a strong history as a hotbed for anti-British activities that were fueled by its conservative, uncompromising theological stance. After the creation of the nation of Pakistan in 1947 numerous satellite Deobandi madressas sprung up throughout Pakistan. These madressas carried on not only the strict Deobandi theological tradition but also its political activism, only now the target had changed. It was no longer the English but the Indian oppression of Muslims in the disputed area of Kashmir that inspired resentment. Later, with the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan in 1979 this resentment would expand to include communism. After the Soviets left the U.N. and the U.S. became demonized as the foreign invading and corrupting powers that threatened the pure expression of Islam.

 

 

In the spring of 1994 two teenage girls from the village of Sang Hesar were abducted by the majahedim and repeatedly raped at the local checkpoint. Mohammed Omar, a retired Afghan commander studying at a local madressa, gathered 30 fellow taliban (students) and mounted a successful rescue. The Majahedim commander was hung from a slowly ascending tank-barrel. This was the birth of a movement that came to be known as the Taliban.

 

 

The majahedim were Islamists who carried the banner of Islam and combated secularism and then communism in Afghanistan. Islamists are modernists who seek a contemporary political interpretation of Islam. Educationally they tilt towards Al-Azhor University in Egypt where they have been strongly influence by the political orientation of the fundamentalist group the Muslim Brotherhood. Because they drew from this model other governments were quick to recognize their authority and they were able to form highly organized political parties.

 

The Taliban are traditionalists who have only entered the political stream in Afghanistan since 1994. They view the roll (sic) of government and society very differently from the majahedim. They do not see Islam in political terms but in religious terms. They seek to return to the purity of the teachings of the Quran and the Sunnah (the practices of the Prophet). They are products of religious madrassas in Pakistan whose roots go back to the Dar-ul-Uloon seminary in Debond, India. Their history makes the Taliban inclined to organize themselves around regional associations rather than political parties.

 

Religious edicts are believed to have a divine source so they carry more authority in this society than humanitarian law that stress individual freedoms. The purpose of government is to be a reflection of the divine will (as interpreted by the Deobondi scholars), not a guardian of individual rights and liberties as insisted upon by the West. [Read PDF in Entirety]

 

So what the heck, John? Why are you rehashing these theo-political strains of Radical Islam?

 

Well feel lucky, I was going to examine some of the organization – I mean – terrorists that adhere to these Radical Islamic ideologies. You know like the Muslim Brotherhood, Hamas, Hezbollah, CAIR, Jamaat ul-Fuqra and so on.

 

The point of this exercise is that American text books are leaving this kind of information out. Since these organizations look back to purist Islam. It is important to tell American students that the Islam that inspires these Islamic terrorists and Radical Muslims is the Islam of Mohammed and the following so-called Rightly Guided Caliphs (i.e. First four Caliphs that were actual buddies with Mo).

 

ACT for America has put together an analysis of text books in America from sixth grade through twelfth grade. Here is the ACT email:

 

Textbook analysis report released today!

A special message from Brigitte Gabriel, President, ACT! for America Education

 

By Brigitte Gabriel

Sent: 3/19/2012 2:04 PM

Sent from ACT for America

 

www.ACTforAmericaEducation.com/

 

It is with great delight that I announce to you that today we released “Education or Indoctrination? The Treatment of Islam in 6th through 12th Grade American Textbooks.”

 

ACT! for America Education Executive Director Guy Rodgers and I began discussing this project nearly four years ago. Today, that project is a reality—and I believe that one year from now you and I will look back on this as a truly historic accomplishment that helped change the course of education in America.

This report shines a bright light on a pattern of errors, omissions and bias in the textbooks reviewed. Our children deserve better. Our children deserve facts and accuracy, not historical revisionism.

To give you just one example of the errors our research uncovered, in discussing the 9/11 attacks, the textbooks typically fail to mention the perpetrators were Muslims or that they acted in the cause of Islamic jihad. In one book the terrorists are portrayed as people fighting for a cause. In just a few years after September 11th, the history of what happened on that tragic day was rewritten in our school textbooks. Omitting this vital information, that jihad was the motivation for the attacks, makes it difficult, if not impossible, for today’s young teens, who don’t remember 9/11, to really understand what happened that day—and why.

Please forward this email to anyone and everyone you know. Help us get the word out far and wide! Over the next few months we hope to wake up America to what this report has uncovered!

To access the report log on to www.ACTforAmericaEducation.com/. Once there you will find the following:

 

·         The Executive Summary of the Report, which was mailed to over 70,000 state and local school board members nationwide;

 

·         The full Report;

 

·         Sub-reports, sorted by each textbook publisher;

 

·         A plan for taking action.

 

 

The few have always made a difference in this crazy, dangerous but wonderful world we live in. This is our time, those of us who “get it” and are concerned about the direction of our future, to come together and work together to make a difference for our country and our future generation.

I am honored to put my hand in yours and work with you to ensure our children receive the best historical education, and America remains the greatest and brightest nation on earth.

Brigitte Gabriel

 

Now here is the link to the Executive Summary to this analysis in which you can also access the full report:

 

http://www.actforamericaeducation.com/textbook-project

 

Below is the welcome message from Brigitte Gabriel to ACT for America Education.

 

JRH 3/20/12

TiZA Joins Muslim Mafia?


Tarik ibn Zehad Gibraltar PD Sterling

John R. Houk

© October 20, 2010

 

The term Muslim Mafia (SA HERE) has been an appellation associated with CAIR by authors Dave Gaubatz and Paul Sperry. The term Muslim Mafia in actuality can refer to numerous Muslim-American organizations that have deep ties to the Muslim Brotherhood or other Salafi-like Muslims either in the USA or exerting theopolitical ideology from a foreign nation.

 

Some of these Salafi or what many would call radical Islamic ties has extended to Muslim enclaves and schools in America. And when I say school I mean Public School utilizing taxpayer funds to educate K-12 students to drill the tenets of radical Islam into young minds.

 

One such case is a Muslim Charter School in Minnesota called Tarek ibn Ziyad Academy (TiZA). ACT for America has sent an email that is facilitating information of the Islamist nature of a Public School receiving taxpayer funds. TiZA has become so abusive in its secrecy that it is utilizing Lawfare and thuggery threats to keep the public from knowing that the Islamic religion is part of the curriculum of the school. The thought behind the TiZA Public School is to provide an environment of Middle Eastern Culture influenced by Islam to students that either have roots to the Middle East or are foreign students from an Islamic Culture. That premise is crazy enough since it is NOT conducive to assimilation to American Culture. The crime is TiZA’s infusion of Islamic religious practice (probably Islamist) on the public dime. AND here is the amazing tidbit of information: The TiZA mafia has angered the deep pockets of the ACLU!

 

The very name of the school should give pause to Americans. TiZA was named after its namesake (which many variations of spelling). Tarek (Tariq) ibn Ziyad invades Christian Spain in 711 AD. Ibn Ziyad’s victory over Visigothic ruler King Roderick spelled the beginning of brutal and humiliating oppression Spanish Christians under Islamic rule. It is kind of like naming a Public School in American culture Benedict Arnold High School.

 

Read the ACT for America email below.

 

JRH 10/20/10

*******************************

A Must-Read: TiZA intimidation tactics

Taxpayer-funded charter school even fighting the ACLU

 

Sent by: ACT for America’

Sent: 10/19/2010 11:58 AM

 

In early 2008 journalist Katherine Kersten broke a story about suspected inappropriate Islamic activities in a public, taxpayer-funded charter school, the Tarek ibn Ziyad Academy (TiZA).

 

When ACT! for America learned of this we swung into action. Chapter leaders contacted local and state officials. Letters to the editor were sent to newspapers. Guy Rodgers, ACT! for America Executive Director, talked with an official at the Minnesota Department of Education (MDOE) regarding a possible investigation.

 

MDOE did launch an investigation, and cited TiZA for two violations of law. During that time, a TiZA official assaulted a news cameraman.

 

Then the ACLU sued TiZA, alleging improper religious activity at a public school.

 

Not surprisingly, as Kersten reports below (highlights added), TiZA is engaging in intimidation and non-compliance tactics to prevent exposure of what it has been doing behind the closed doors of its school—a public school, paid for with tax dollars!!!

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Katherine Kersten: TiZA vs. the search for truth

http://www.startribune.com/opinion/commentary/105067899.html?page=3&c=y

 

The battle over the role of Islam in a Minnesota public school is heating up again in a federal courtroom in St. Paul. The conflict began in January 2009, when the ACLU of Minnesota sued Tarek ibn Ziyad Academy — a K-8 charter school with campuses in Inver Grove Heights and Blaine — for violating constitutional prohibitions against government endorsement of religion.

TiZA since has fought tooth and nail — erecting procedural barriers to prevent the ACLU from investigating what goes on behind its doors. The school’s tactics have gone far beyond the usual rough-and-tumble of lawyers in our adversary system. Its chief tool has been attempted intimidation of all who would draw back the curtain on its secrets.

 

One of TiZA’s first targets was the ACLU itself. A few months after the suit began, the school filed a $100,000-plus defamation claim, citing ACLU executive director Chuck Samuelson’s simple statement that “[TiZA is] a theocratic school … as plain as the substantial nose on my face.” The court dismissed the claim.

 

In January 2010, the ACLU was back in court to seek a protective order, on grounds that intimidation by TiZA was discouraging potential witnesses from appearing. The ACLU filed affidavits by a former TiZA parent and a former TiZA staff member, who described what they interpreted as threats of violence against them. In her affidavit, the female staff member said that Asad Zaman — TiZA’s executive director — had suggested after she displeased him: “We could just kill you, yeah tell your husband we’ll do his job for him.” (Zaman has no recollection of making such a statement, he said in an affidavit.) The court barred witness harassment or intimidation by either party.

 

In June 2010, the ACLU returned to court to quash what it described as yet another TiZA attempt to intimidate current and former employees from speaking about what they had seen at the public school. TiZA’s “Staff Handbooks include a secrecy clause, and related threat of legal action for violating it,” according to the ACLU’s court filings. TiZA “wields [these provisions] as a sledgehammer to keep former employees quiet about what they saw at the school.” As a result, “former TiZA employees have expressed fear about speaking to the ACLU.”

 

According to the ACLU, TiZA’s refusal to agree not to enforce the secrecy clause “sends the ominous signal that current and former employees who talk to the ACLU may be forced to defend themselves against a baseless, expensive lawsuit.”

 

On Oct. 1, Judge Donovan Frank agreed — affirming an order the ACLU had earlier won barring TiZA from enforcing the confidentiality clause in the context of this litigation.

The court’s order and memorandum spoke volumes: “It appears that information related to TiZA’s business, finances, operations and office procedures is public data and cannot be kept secret.” “The relevant question … is why TiZA, a public charter school, does not want to allow its former and current employees to participate in the informal discovery process to ascertain the truth about how TiZA operates.”

 

The court’s strong language in response to TiZA’s actions was unusual: “[I]ntimidation and threats will not sit well with a fact-finder such as a jury.” As a result of the school’s actions, “[T]he Court may be required to draw adverse inferences about how TiZA operates as a result of TiZA’s efforts to keep information about its operations secret. … [TiZA’s] behavior during the discovery process thus far … has not been consistent with a good faith search for the truth.”

 

The ACLU has characterized TiZA’s recent actions regarding the secrecy clause as “only the last in a long line of intimidation efforts.” Not quite. Last month, an attack was launched from a different front.

 

Several organizations that are not even parties to the lawsuit went to court in an attempt to disqualify the ACLU’s lawyers — Dorsey & Whitney — from representing the ACLU on grounds that Dorsey personnel had previously communicated with Zaman about entities involved in the litigation. The organizations include the Muslim American Society of Minnesota (MAS-MN), MAS-MN Property Holding Corporation and the Minnesota Education Trust (MET).

 

What might they fear? Perhaps that Dorsey lawyers are in a position to prove that the scandal thus far — and Zaman’s role in it — is just the tip of the iceberg. Dorsey lawyers had this to say in a Sept. 10 letter filed with the court:

 

“The ACLU believes Mr. Zaman’s testimony relating to control of virtually every significant event at TiZA, MAS-MN, MET and MET’s subsidiaries, coupled with his efforts to hide such control, constitute powerful evidence against TiZA’s denials that it is a Muslim school and that it funnels state and federal money to other Muslim organizations.”

 

Every time we read about this lawsuit, we have to pinch ourselves and say: We’re talking about a public, taxpayer-funded school.

Katherine Kersten is a Twin Cities writer and speaker.

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TiZA Joins Muslim Mafia?

John R. Houk

© October 20, 2010

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A Must-Read: TiZA intimidation tactics

 

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