It Could Always Be Worse


A dust storm approaches Stratford, Texas in April, 1935. (Credt: NOAA/MCT/MCT/Getty Images)

 

I’m a Baby-Boomer. My parents were teenagers during The Great Depression of the 1930s. Of course that means my grandparents were adults during that trial of economic poverty in America and globally for that matter.

 

You may have heard the old story from your parents or grandparents (depending on the generation you were born from) about the days they to walk to and from to school up hill both ways in the snow? Perhaps with little clothing or decrepit shoes? With no lunch or perhaps a stale dried biscuit? Though I suspect a little exaggeration to get their point across, this was the Depression era of which they were speaking.

 

So, what was the point being hammered into my thoughts?

 

If you want something in life, you have work for it. If you desire a decent future, you have to plan for it. Why? If you are looking for free lunch, you’ll probably starve to death.

 

Justin Smith addresses this issue of the Leftist preaching of everything must be made free or the end of the world as we know it is upon us. Life DOES NOT work that way.

 

JRH 7/23/18

Please Support NCCR

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It Could Always Be Worse

 

By Justin O. Smith

Sent: 7/22/2018 11:26 PM

 

Keep complaining about not having enough. It could always be worse.

 

Today, we hear so many complain about needing $15.00 per hour and “free” this and “free” that, never understanding that nothing is “free” and someone, somewhere, ends up having to pay for it. They demand free healthcare, free college education, free housing and even free money. Some cities, like Stockton, California and Chicago, Illinois are even considering handing out free money, calling it a “universal basic income” for doing nothing.

 

A group of migrants waiting for relief checks outside of building. Calipatria, California. February 1937. Credits: Dorothea Lange; The Library of Congress

 

The Depression Era and the Dust Bowl Days were terribly hard and tough days. My dad, his siblings and my Grandparents lived through the worst dust storm in U.S. history. They were in Springfield, Colorado, one-hundred and sixty miles north of Amarillo, TX and eighty miles north of Guyman, OK, in the middle of the Black Sunday dust storm of 1935. There were many people who did not make it to shelter in time, and they died after being caught out in it.

 

Migrant man and woman walking along road. Crittenden County, Arkansas. May 1936. Credits: Carl Mydans

 

The Great Depression itself took a massive toll on everybody. Millions of Americans barely survived those years. The economic collapse was terrifying in its scope and impact. The average family income crashed from an average of $6132.22 in 1929 to just $1550 four years later. In Pennsylvania coal fields, three or four families crowded together in one-room shacks and lived on wild weeds. In Arkansas, families were found staying in caves, while whole families in Oakland, CA were living in sewer pipes.

 

Migrant family walking on road, pulling belongings in carts and wagons. Pittsburg County, Oklahoma. June 1938. Credits: Dorothea Lange; The Library of Congress

 

Incredibly, while there were millions of cases of malnutrition, the death toll from starvation was supposedly surprisingly low, as the government had interceded as best it could and soup lines and charitable kitchens were found in every city across the country. However, millions of Americans did too often come close to the edge of death by starvation, and according to many researchers, starvation deaths were very often attributed to some other affliction, for a litany of medical explanations.

 

President Herbert Hoover declared: “Nobody is actually starving. The hobos are better fed than they have ever been.”

 

But, in the New York City of 1931, there were twenty known cases of starvation, and in 1934, one-hundred and ten people starved to death. There were so many accounts of New Yorkers starving that the West African nation of Cameroon sent $3.77 in relief.

 

Tenant farmer family. Hale County, Alabama. 1936. Credits: Walker Evans; The Library of Congress

 

Despite the hardships it inflicted, the Great Depression drew some families closer together. They lost their cars and homes, often everything they owned and found their true nature, their true character and their souls. Families had to think outside the box in ingenious manners through the hard times, because their survival depended on it. They moved in with relatives to cut expenses, combined their incomes, bought day old bread and did without many necessities just to scrape by. And, while many people and families placed their faith in themselves and their own dogged determination to survive, many other families drew comfort from their faith and sustained themselves with hope for the future, that everything would turn out well in the end.

 

Today, far too many Americans no longer believe that our nation’s problems can be solved by people acting alone and through voluntary associations. Increasingly, they look to our federal government, the Nanny State, and currently, there are millions of Americans afforded massive amounts of aid, one-fifth of the population according to the 2012 Census Bureau report.

 

America’s poor now live better than some “affluent” leaders in Third World countries. They all have government housing and food assistance, along with scores of other programs designed to help clothe and educate them too.

 

Children on porch, leaning on railing. Pursglove, West Virginia. September 1938. Credits: Marion Post Wolcott; The Library of Congress

 

Today’s “poor” are millionaires in comparison to the real poor of the 1930s Depression Era.

 

And as my Dear Ol’ Lil Granma would tell me, right up until she passed from this world at age 96, “I cried because I had no shoes, until I saw a man who had no feet.”

 

by Justin O Smith

__________________

Depression Era Photos From: http://www.pbs.org/kenburns/dustbowl/photos/

 

Edited by John R. Houk.

Embedded source links are by the Editor.

 

© Justin O. Smith

 

Author: oneway2day

I am a Neoconservative Christian Right blogger. I also spend a significant amount of time of exposing theopolitical Islam.

One thought on “It Could Always Be Worse”

  1. YES IT COULD BE WORSE, AND IT IS A GUARANTEE THAT IT IS GOING TO GET WORSE, MORE SO THAN THE WORLD HAS EVER SEEN OR WILL SEE AGAIN, THE MARK OF THE BEAST IS HEADED FOR “FULL” IMPLEMENTATION FOR those of satan WHO ACCEPT IT, ETC…WE HAVE NOT SEEN NOTHING YET, THE NEPHILIM ARE GOING TO RETURN FOR ONE LAST VENTURE AS CERN NOT ONLY OPENS UP EVIL FROM THE HEAVENS, BUT FROM UNDERNEATH THE EARTH AS WELL, WE SHALL HAVE ENCOUNTERS AND ATTACKS FROM ALL SIDES. IF PEOPLE DO NOT BELIEVE THIS WILL HAPPEN, THEN THEY CAN NOT BELIEVE IN THE HOLY BIBLE NOR JESUS CHRIST, AND THEY ARE NOT TO BE TRUSTED IF THEY SAY SO. IT IS WRITTEN AND SO SHALL IT BE!!! COMPROMISING VALUES AND SEEKING EQUALITY FOR EVIL, HAS BROUGHT US TO OUR DEATHS AND JUDGEMENT.

    Like

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